Frankly, the Election was a Boomer Victory over their own Kids

By the time I headed off to bed last Saturday the federal election was effectively over, with Labor leader Bill Shorten conceded that it was unlikely that Labor would win the seats required to form government.

The election result came as a surprise to many political pundits, given that most polls had predicted a comfortable Labor win in the run-up to the election.

As I write this, the Liberal/National coalition has secured 78 seats, ensuring a majority for the new Morrison government in the upcoming 46th Parliament of Australia.

Waking up to a cold Sunday morning with the previous day’s election result rattling around in my head I decided that a ride to the hills was in order. Donning copious layers of cycling gear to ward off the chill, I pointed my trusty bike in the direction of Eltham and off I rode.

Leaving early, my route took me through a still sleepy Brunswick, the inner-city suburb just north of Melbourne, out through Heidelberg and finally to Eltham, nestled at the foothills of the Shire of Nillumbik in Melbourne’s outer east.

Elated in Eltham, Bummed in Brunswick

Eltham sits in the electorate of Menzies, and the incumbent Liberal candidate, Kevin Andrews, comfortably retained his seat with a Two Candidate Preferred (TCP) vote of 57%.  Having a well-earned brekky at the Eltham shopping strip it was hard not to notice two distinct themes.

Firstly, I was surrounded by people in their mid-fifties and beyond, a demographic oft-labelled “Baby Boomers”. Secondly, these Boomers were (from their demeanour and the bits of conversation I caught), thrilled that the Coalition government had been returned for another term in office. It was fair to say that the mood in Eltham that Sunday morning was positively “chipper”.   

The ride home took me through the heart of Gen Y-centric Brunswick, in the electorate of Wills, where Labor’s Peter Khalil held off a stern challenge from The Greens. There the cafés lining ultra-hip Lygon Street told a very different story.

The mood in Brunswick was distinctly more sombre, with none of the energy pulsating around Eltham. Poker-faced twenty and thirty-something Millennials sat huddled in cafes in quiet contemplation.

In the few short hours I spent riding that day I saw the two sides of the election outcome; the winners and the also-rans. And as a Gen X, wedged between the Boomers and their Gen Y kids, I find myself asking one question: what exactly happened on Saturday 18th May and what does it mean for the various generations?

Read on to find out…

Continue reading “Frankly, the Election was a Boomer Victory over their own Kids”

Budget 2019/20 – Same Old, Shame Old

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg stood up in Parliament yesterday evening to deliver his maiden Budget speech as Treasurer, having inherited the job some seven months ago amidst the Liberal party in-fighting and change of leadership.

There’s a lot riding on this Budget, and it shows. In essence this Budget has one job, and one job only; to put the Coalition government in a position where it has the best chance of retaining government at the yet-to-be-called general election.

Political pundits now put the most likely date of the next election at 11 May, a mere five or so weeks away. We’ll know soon enough, as it’s expected that Prime Minister Morrison will take that drive up to Yarralumla any day now.

But back to the Budget. The Good, the Not-so-Good and the Questionable. What exactly does it contain (other than the phrase “without increasing taxes”, uttered by Treasurer Frydenberg no less than nine times during his speech)?

More importantly, how will it affect you, your nearest and dearest and your prospects for a brighter future? Read on to find out…

Continue reading “Budget 2019/20 – Same Old, Shame Old”

Australia’s housing affordability woes: Part 1

couple in house with boxes

Australia’s home affordability woes have impacted a whole generation of young Australians now facing the daunting challenge of breaking into the property market.

Clover Co-Founder Harry Chemay explains why ownership rates among young Australians, particularly those under the age of 35, have experienced a significant decline over the last four decades.

Continue reading “Australia’s housing affordability woes: Part 1”

4 things you need to do before you start investing

A research report from RMIT on women and money in Australia found that 48% of women were not willing to take any financial risks at all. For many women, their hard earned savings is not something they are prepared to risk.

A common perception of your typical investor is what we see in mainstream media from movies like The Wolf of Wall Street. What we aren’t shown is that there are several ways to invest and many of them don’t involve speculating on hot stocks.

Continue reading “4 things you need to do before you start investing”

5 ways to avoid debt in your 20s

Hands opening up an empty wallet

 

Ah, your sweet 20s. It’s absolutely guaranteed that you will have one sack full of adventures and another full of mistakes.

But that doesn’t mean you don’t need to think about what financial shape you’ll be in once you do say hello to that inevitable 30th birthday. Because it’s about then that you may be wondering about buying a house, starting a family, and perhaps even planning for the future with healthy personal finance habits in the bank.

Saving in your 20s is hard, and racking up a mountain of debt is easy. But don’t fret – it’s never too late to start blasting that 20-something debt and setting off on the road to a bright financial future.
Continue reading “5 ways to avoid debt in your 20s”

The best apps to solve share house money woes

Housemate apps clover

It’s a fact: Living with housemates can be stressful, even at the best of times.

Waiting for your turn in the shower, people pinching your food or the pile of dirty dishes always cluttering up the kitchen sink are just the tip of the share house nightmares iceberg.

On top of these common pain points, shared living often comes with awkward conversations surrounding the splitting of shared expenses.

Continue reading “The best apps to solve share house money woes”

How to solve four common money problems faced by couples

Even at the best of times, relationships can be difficult. Although most of us seek true love and that tale of ‘happily ever after’, it’s a total myth that if you find just the right person to spend your life with, you’ll never experience any conflict.

Even if you are with a very special someone who’s really suited to you, it’s never smooth sailing all the time. But there’s something that really can spell troubled waters for many, many couples:

Money.

Continue reading “How to solve four common money problems faced by couples”